Refugees

Legal and Policy Framework of Migration Governance

This report aims to provide a contextual understanding of migration governance in the Lebanese context, as well as its implications for refugees and migrants. Towards this end, this report provides an overview of the legal and policy framework in Lebanon, notably within the context of the Syrian refugee crisis erupting in 2011. Moreover, the report critically evaluates the legal statuses – if any – pertaining to ‘asylum seekers’, ‘refugees’, and ‘migrants’ on the one hand, and the role of state and non-state actors on the other.

Study for a Viable Framework for Livelihood and Social Enterprise Projects in Bar Elias in the Bekaa

This report presents the findings of the labour market study in Bar Elias and the Bekaa, focusing on the labour activities, initiatives, and aspirations of current B&Z beneficiaries and Syrian refugee youth and women heads of household respondents that could potentially be engaged through future interventions. It also presents a general overview of the formal employment sectors that Syrians can engage in, by law, as well as principles and approaches that could be adopted for the informal economic activities that Syrian refugees engage in.

Field Diagnosis: Prostitution and Trafficking in Women in the Eastern Suburbs of Beirut

Lebanon provides a refuge for many women and teenagers driven away from neighbouring countries by wars and conflicts, as well as some who have come from other countries seeking better economic conditions. Trafficking and prostitution are exacerbated in a context of unemployment and insecurity, where the State is often absent.

The Neglected Palestinian Refugees in Lebanon and the Syrian Refugee Crisis

Based on field study in Lebanon Spring 2016, this paper focuses on the consequences of the refugee crisis for the Palestinian refugees in Lebanon. 455.000 Palestinians are registered by UNWRA, the UN agency established to take care of Palestinian refugees in the Middle East. App. 250.000 are living in the Palestinian camps while
the rest are living outside Lebanon. Lebanon refuse to integrate or nationalize the Palestinians who have very restricted access to labor market and receive no help from the Lebanese government in public services.
 

Palestinian Refugees in Lebanon: ANERA Reports on the ground in the Middle East

The list of challenges Palestinian refugee families living in Lebanon face is long and overwhelming. They live in overcrowded camps and have to deal with discrimination, isolation and social exclusion. The refugees often refer to themselves as “forgotten people” and feel they are living in a hostile environment where their basic human rights are not represented or protected. Caught in the middle of an unsettled political conflict beyond their control, they manage to survive with limited resources and a restricted legal, economic and social system.
 

Widening Access to Quality Education for Syrian Refugees: The Role of Private and NGO Sectors in Lebanon

As the Syrian crisis enters the fourth year, there is a timely need to reflect on the wider implications on Lebanon. The influx of over a million and half Syrian refugees has brought a total of 400,000 school-age refugees to Lebanon. This dramatic demographic shift poses a formidable challenge to an education system suited to deliver education to a national student population of just over 900,000.

Local Politics and the Syrian Refugee Crisis: Exploring Responses in Turkey, Lebanon, and Jordan

Refugee protection is inherently political. While international law and values inevitably influence governments’ decisions about how to respond to refugees, so too do power and interests. Host and donor states’ commitment to assist, protect and provide solutions for refugees are all shaped by whether and to what extent they perceive refugees to be a burden or a benefit in relation to security and development outcomes, for example.

Health Status and Health Needs of Older Refugees from Syria in Lebanon

This study sought to characterize the physical and emotional conditions, dietary habits, coping practices, and living conditions of this elderly population arriving in Lebanon between March 2011 and March 2013. A systematic selection of 210 older refugees from Syria was drawn from a listing of 1800 refugees over age 60 receiving assistance from the Caritas Lebanon Migrant Center (CLMC) or the Palestinian Women’s Humanitarian Organization (PALWHO).

The Refugee Crisis in Lebanon and Jordan: The Need for Economic Development Spending

The entry of Syrian refugees into Lebanon and Jordan has resulted in unprecedented social and economic challenges to both countries. These are felt on a day-to-day basis by all Lebanese and Jordanian citizens whether through higher rents and declining public service availability, or through health and education infrastructure that is stretched beyond its limits. There is no doubt that both host countries have been incredibly generous to refugees, particularly at the societal level.

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