Gender

Politics, Progress, and Parliament in 2018: Can Lebanese Women Make Headway?

Lebanon may witness a remarkable rise in the number of women serving in Parliament come May 2018 due to initiatives from women’s groups, “civil society” activists, and the substantial number of female candidates – 113 at the start of the election period. However, as this briefing paper shows, Lebanese women continue to face numerous challenges in entering government. The new electoral law passed in June 2017 does not provide women with equal opportunity to be elected, and it is yet to be seen whether it will increase female representation in Parliament.

Images MENA: A study by A Qualitative Study on War, Masculinities, and Gender Relations with Lebanese and Syrian Refugee Men and Women

Only a handful of studies in Lebanon have shed light on the changing gendered dynamics within the refugee families by comparing gender roles, expectations, and practices before and after displacement (as result of armed conflict). And even when such research is carried out, it has seldom examined how changing roles and identities related to masculinities affect gender relations.

Submission to the United Nations Universal Periodic Review of Lebanon: 23rd Session of the UPR Working Group of the Human Rights Council

This report is submitted by: the A project (1), the Center for Reproductive Rights (2), and the Sexual Rights Initiative (3). It addresses gender equality and sexual and reproductive rights in Lebanon and makes references specifically to family violence, marital rape, personal status law, rights of LGBT persons, contraception and safe abortion.

Exploring the Demand for Prostitution: What Male Buyers Say about their Motives, Practices and Perceptions

The following study is a first attempt to explore and better understand the demand side in Lebanon where little has been written on this critical component of the prostitution industry. Studies on male buyers of sexual acts are not only rare, but when they exist, they often deal with the health side of the subject (e.g., the spreading of HIV/AIDS, use of condom, use of drugs).

School-Related Gender Based Violence (SRGBV) in Lebanon

It is well known that the cultural norms and the patriarchal society in Lebanon contribute to encouraging discrimination and any form of violence against women and children. More specifically, GBV in schools (SRGBV) and universities (URGBV) go unchecked in the face of indifference from the institutions’ administrations, community and the Ministries within the country.

Gendering State–Citizen Relations in Lebanon: The Case of the Family Violence Bill 2014

This report examines the nature of interaction and engagement between Lebanese citizens’ collectives and the state on gender-specific matters, through the case study of the Family Violence Bill that was passed in 2014. It analyses the practical ways in which civil society organised and engaged with the state to lobby for the Family Violence Bill prior to its passing.

Attitudes towards Domestic Violence in Lebanon: A Qualitative Study of Primary Care Practitioners

In most Arab countries, family matters including Domestic Violence continue to be handled by religious courts as civil legislation does not criminalise acts of violence within the family. In Lebanon, a law to this effect has been debated within a parliamentary committee since 2010. It is strongly opposed as it conflicts with much current legislation based on tradition. For example, article 503 defines rape as a forcible sexual act committed against someone other than a spouse.

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