Gender

Politics, Progress, and Parliament in 2018: Can Lebanese Women Make Headway?

Lebanon may witness a remarkable rise in the number of women serving in Parliament come May 2018 due to initiatives from women’s groups, “civil society” activists, and the substantial number of female candidates – 113 at the start of the election period. However, as this briefing paper shows, Lebanese women continue to face numerous challenges in entering government. The new electoral law passed in June 2017 does not provide women with equal opportunity to be elected, and it is yet to be seen whether it will increase female representation in Parliament.

Images MENA: A study by A Qualitative Study on War, Masculinities, and Gender Relations with Lebanese and Syrian Refugee Men and Women

Only a handful of studies in Lebanon have shed light on the changing gendered dynamics within the refugee families by comparing gender roles, expectations, and practices before and after displacement (as result of armed conflict). And even when such research is carried out, it has seldom examined how changing roles and identities related to masculinities affect gender relations.

Gendering State–Citizen Relations in Lebanon: The Case of the Family Violence Bill 2014

This report examines the nature of interaction and engagement between Lebanese citizens’ collectives and the state on gender-specific matters, through the case study of the Family Violence Bill that was passed in 2014. It analyses the practical ways in which civil society organised and engaged with the state to lobby for the Family Violence Bill prior to its passing.

The State of Gender Justice in the Arab Region

This study maps the current state of gender justice in the Arab region, documenting barriers as well as opportunities. Its primary research aim is to determine how to develop an environment, at the legal, policy, and social levels that is conducive to gender justice. The study also provides insight on the state of gender justice through a legal perspective, in addition to de facto perspective. This is accomplished through a review of significant legislative, political, and social changes that have arisen from 2004 to 2016.

Civil Society Review issue 2 - Lebanese, refugee, and migrant women in Lebanon: From sociopolitical marginality to turnaround strategies

While women’s issues and rights have been at the forefront of public and civil society debate, academic, and activist publications, women’s inequalities and the discrimination women face in Lebanon have been notably undermined, whether as citizens, refugees, or migrants. However, if the publicising of the “issue of women in Lebanon” has prompted the production of more “gender-related” information and knowledge, it has oftentimes adopted the rhetoric of denunciation and victimisation.

The Long-Term Challenges of Forced Migration: Perspectives from Lebanon, Jordan and Iraq

The Syrian conflict has forcibly displaced more than 11 million people to neighbouring countries such as Turkey, Lebanon, Jordan, Iraq and Egypt, and elsewhere both regionally and globally. In a workshop held on 17–18 June 2016, the LSE Middle East Centre brought together a diverse group of people (policymakers from host states, representatives from international organisations, academics and NGOs practitioners) to explore the effects of the Syrian refugee emergency on Arab host states such as Lebanon, Jordan, and Iraq. This volume brings together a set of papers presented at the workshop.

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