Policy Brief

Politics, Progress, and Parliament in 2018: Can Lebanese Women Make Headway?

Lebanon may witness a remarkable rise in the number of women serving in Parliament come May 2018 due to initiatives from women’s groups, “civil society” activists, and the substantial number of female candidates – 113 at the start of the election period. However, as this briefing paper shows, Lebanese women continue to face numerous challenges in entering government. The new electoral law passed in June 2017 does not provide women with equal opportunity to be elected, and it is yet to be seen whether it will increase female representation in Parliament.

Lebanon’s 2018 Elections: An Opportunity for “New” Political Actors?

For the first time in nine years the Lebanese political scene is mobilising for elections. Although little has changed in the overall makeup of Parliament, the 2018 parliamentary elections exhibit significant differences, with a record 976 registered candidates, 113 of whom are female. A number of both male and female registered candidates, came from outside traditional establishment parties and zu‘ama which have historically dominated Lebanese politics.

Examining Sexual Harassment Draft Laws in Lebanon: Women's Equal Right to Public Space

In light of recent proposals for legislation againsts sexual harassment (SH) in Lebanon, this policy brief explores the subject of SH in public, institutional and workplace settings. The paper dissects the two draft laws presented by MP Ghassan Moukheiber and Minister of State for Women's Affairs, Jean Ogasapian, and provides policy suggestions and recommendations.

Justice for Stability: Addressing the impact of mass displacement on Lebanon’s justice system

This policy brief outlines options for strengthening rule of law in Lebanon to improve access to justice for both Lebanese citizens and Syrian refugees. It discusses stopgap measures for the temporary stay of Syrian refugees in the country and highlights opportunities for long-term reform of the justice system. The brief provides recommendations to key actors on actions to reduce the unsustainable pressure on the Lebanese justice system and to ensure protection of the displaced population.

"A Shoulder to Lean On.” Towards Rights-Based Interventions and Policies for Syrian Refugees in Lebanon.

This policy brief analyses the socio-political implications of the so-called October policies, and suggests legislative, political, and practical measures to improve the situation of Syrian refugees in Lebanon. It also aims to inform policy formulation regarding Syrian refugees from a human rights-based perspective, while discussing modalities for enhanced programming at the civil society level.

Humanitarian Assistance in Lebanon: Overview, Challenges and Recommendations. Revisiting the Humanitarian System: The Call for Country Ownership in the Case of Lebanon.

The 2015 Global Humanitarian Assistance (GHA) Report highlights that in 2013, 147 countries received humanitarian assistance, with countries from the Arab region, particularly those affected by the Syrian crisis, being the highest beneficiaries of aid. More than 3 billion US dollars was directed to Lebanon, Syria and Jordan. This amounts to 15% of the total international humanitarian response and 43% of the funding directed to the top ten recipients. Notably, Lebanon is among the top 10 countries receiving humanitarian assistance.

Engaging Municipalities in the Response to the Syria Refugee Crisis in Lebanon

The population shift from Syria, as a result of the Syrian Crisis, is causing enormous pressure on host communities and exacerbating instability factors. In an in-depth assessments in 12 vulnerable municipalities in Lebanon, Mercy Corps found that 71% of the surveyed host community indicated that conditions have worsened in their municipalities. As such, with socio-economic conditions in the country continue to decline and political instability rises, it is projected that there will be an increased risk of intolerance and withdrawal of host community assistance to refugees.

Security That Protects: Informing Policy on Local Security Provision in Lebanese Communities Hosting Syrian Refugees

The purpose of this policy brief is to inform policy formulation on local level security provision and refugee protection, and to propose modalities for upgrading the sys- tems of the Lebanese security institutions in a way that strengthens protection of the Lebanese communities and the Syrian refugees they host.

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