Migration, Mobility and Circulation

Legal and Policy Framework of Migration Governance

This report aims to provide a contextual understanding of migration governance in the Lebanese context, as well as its implications for refugees and migrants. Towards this end, this report provides an overview of the legal and policy framework in Lebanon, notably within the context of the Syrian refugee crisis erupting in 2011. Moreover, the report critically evaluates the legal statuses – if any – pertaining to ‘asylum seekers’, ‘refugees’, and ‘migrants’ on the one hand, and the role of state and non-state actors on the other.

Transport and Connectivity to Global Value Chains: Illustrations from the Arab Region

This report explores the impact of transport infrastructure and services availability and efficiency on Global Value Chains connectivity. It also assesses whether the Arab region meets the necessary requirements of infrastructure, logistics, and trade facilitation, to be able to participate meaningfully in Global Value Chains.

The Legal Status of Syrian Refugees in Lebanon

In October 2014, Lebanon’s Council of Ministers adopted a comprehensive policy on Syrian displacement, one explicit goal of which is to decrease the number of Syrians in Lebanon by reducing access to territory and encouraging return to Syria. This ambition is currently being implemented through the December 2014 General Security Office (GSO) new set of entry requirements for Syrians and new rules for Syrian nationals already in Lebanon applying for and renewing their residency permits.

Trapped in Lebanon: The Alarming Human Rights and Human Security Situation of Syrian Refugees in Lebanon

This report analyses the human rights and human security situation of refugees from Syria and their impact on the Lebanese society. Since the beginning of the conflict
in Syria, Lebanon has received ever-increasing numbers of Syrian citizens and Palestinian refugees living in Syria who were seeking refuge. With almost one and a half million refugees out of a population of four million, Lebanon has the highest proportion of refugees world-wide, and one of the highest in absolute numbers. The country has received more refugees from Syria than the entire European Union.

Without Protection: How the Lebanese Justice System Fails Migrant Domestic Workers

On December 9, 2009, a Lebanese criminal court sentenced a Lebanese woman to 15 days in jail for repeatedly beating Jonalin Malibago, her Filipina maid, three years earlier. Lebanese newspapers hailed the case a landmark victory for the country’s estimated 200,000 migrant domestic workers (MDWs), many of whom report abuse at the hands of their employers. The case illustrated the positive role that the judiciary can play in protecting MDWs, even though the sentence was lenient given the violation.

An Exploratory Study of Psychoanalytic and Social Factors in the Abuse of Migrant Domestic Workers by Female Employers in Lebanon

The brief of this qualitative exploratory study was to conduct targeted interviews with female employers of migrant domestic workers, psychiatrists, lawyers and institutional stakeholders in Lebanon. In conjunction with previous empirical and theoretical research on the topic of human rights violations against migrant domestic workers, the study provides an analysis of the conditions, circumstances of and possible explanations for such violations.
 

The Situation of Palestinian Refugees in Lebanon

This document provides information about the situation of Palestine refugees in Lebanon, including non-registered Palestinian refugees, undocumented (“non-ID”) Palestinians, and Palestine refugees from Syria. It covers the human rights and humanitarian situation of these refugees, as well as their limited access to basic services and livelihoods. It is based on information provided by UNRWA and other available sources up to 23 February 2016.

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